Of Pastors Warning Single Ladies Not To Marry Jobless Men

Nigerian cleric Enoch Adejare Adeboye has warned single ladies to avoid marrying jobless men. Jobless men, he said, have the tendencies to use, dump and abandon ladies.

Of Pastors Warning Single Ladies Not To Mary Jobless Men
Nigerian cleric Enoch Adejare Adeboye has warned single ladies to avoid marrying jobless men. Jobless men, he said, have the tendencies to use, dump and abandon ladies/Wikipedia 

Due to the corporate and business success of many women today, a lot of them earn more money than men, and some men take advantage of it, charming their way into these women’s hearts, but have nothing to offer financially, motivated nor vision-wise.

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They will spend her money, drive her car, live in her house, eat her food and use her credit card – all for free. Actually, it has become some sort of a game among some single men who chase these successful, career or businesswomen just for financial benefits.

Significantly, one of the biggest criticisms non-working men have received today is that they are lazy and don’t want to find a job or do any work.

The church is one such institution that has consistently and unapologetically brat-shamed jobless men, even going a mile in warning single women to turn down their love proposals.

It’s 2019, and the saga continues.

Nigerian cleric Enoch Adeboye recently warned single ladies to avoid marrying jobless men during the May Special Prayer and Thanksgiving service on Sunday, May 6, at the RCCG Throne of Grace, National headquarters in Ebute Metta area of Lagos state. Jobless men, he said, have the tendencies to use, dump and abandon ladies.

According to him, a woman should not marry a man that has no work, “if not you will be the work.”

“My beloved daughters, don’t marry a man who has no job. Before God gave Eve to Adam, he gave him a job. He said this is the garden, keep it.”

The General Overseer of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG) went on to say it is not sinful for a single lady to politely ask any man proposing marriage whether he has a job.

“If he tells you that he’s a contractor, ask him to show you the evidence of all the contracts he’s done. Because the contract he’s talking about is you. He wants to live off you. Don’t be a fool.

If he hasn’t got a steady income, if he hasn’t got a job, don’t marry him. Go and get a job first. Men provide for the house, not the other way round. Those who would not work, should not eat, and if they can’t eat, they can’t even marry.”

Adeboye said the man is key and that women are conceived as helpmeets. He argued only somebody who has a job can be helped.

“Whatever the woman does is help. The man is a major director in the house,” he stressed.

Similarly, society appears to be in agreement with what Pastor Adeboye said.

A 2017 report by Reuters established that most women would marry for love over money — unless the man is unemployed, according to a new survey.

Three out of four women said they would not wed someone without a job, and 65 percent would feel uncomfortable tying the knot if they themselves were jobless.

But over 91 percent of single women said they would marry for love over money.

“It is ironic that women place more weight on love than money, yet won’t marry if they or their potential suitor is unemployed,” said Meghan Casserly, of ForbesWoman which conducted the survey with the website YourTango.com.

Even more telling, she said, is that 77 percent of women surveyed believe they can have it all — a fulfilling relationship and family life, as well as a successful career.

Meanwhile, new research conducted by writer British Christian writer Samuel Verbi in partnership with a megachurch in the United Kingdom revealed that there is a dearth of single men in the church.

The challenge thus becomes, with the increasing rate of unemployment in countries like Zimbabwe, and the paucity of men in the church, what would become of single ladies? Question for another day…

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